The Boatist

Sailboat Ownership, Translation Work and Tales of Minor Adventure

Retire early, be passionate, don't worry, die poor

Tuesday, November 20, 2012

The Corbin Brothers

My brother Cesar also owns a Corbin 39 (center cockpit) called Lapu Lapu, which he built from a bare hull. He also built most of the interior on my boat Jakatar. When cruising, Cesar eats only salted pork, bananas, chickpeas and also oranges to keep scurvy away; and he eats oatmeal for breakfast, but I shouldn't be telling you that.

When we docked in Horta, Azores, after a 23-day voyage from New York, he leaped from Jakatar, ran wildly down the dock and up the street barefoot, wearing a rag resembling a pair of shorts and zigzagging with "sailor's vertigo" as people scrambled to get out of his path. He came to a quick halt at a kiosk where he bough a pack of cigarettes, lit one up and looked around smiling as the nearby policeman slipped his gun back into the holster. I'm kidding of course, about the policeman.

He no longer smokes and bought a new pair of shorts.

Captain Cesar showing off his work of art and his muscles in Port Dover, Lake Erie.

My other brother Luis has a...I forget the make of his boat. It's a great boat but smaller. He's the smart one in the family. That explains why he got a smaller vessel - at a fraction of the price for triple the fun. He used to design sailboats when he was a teenager back on the farm in Canada, so I think I'll blame him for getting us all into this racket.
Luis sailing his boat on Lake Erie with his twin daughters Erika and Michelle who are also nuts about boats. It must be in the genes

My mother is crazy about boats too, so I figure we must be related to Vasco da Gama, the Portuguese explorer who discovered the route to India. My father, on the other hand, liked fishing from the beach. That was it, he didn't even like to drink water all that much. We forgive him because, otherwise, he was a good man.

At this very moment Cesar is making his way down from Toronto to Florida (by car) where he has a house near the ocean. He plans to sail the boat down next winter. It's a tough life, I know, you bet, but I'm confident he'll survive another winter without bone-chilling temperatures, snow, slush and all that fun stuff.

I don't want to anger my Nordic readers, and I won't because snow is beautiful. Let's face it, if warm weather and beaches were all that wonderful, the whole world would be living in the Caribbean or at other similar locations. Amen.

This post was going be called "Boat Battery Saga III", but I figured you deserved something better.

4 comments:

  1. OMG! That's alotta Martelieras! Thanks for sharing this. It's nice to have family who relate with the glorious madness of our slavery to boats and the sea.

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    1. There's only one Marteleira clan in the world. It began when two brothers migrated from the town of Marteleira to my hometown. They bred like rabbits and named all their little bunnies Marteleira. We mutated from rabbits to dolphins. And believe it or not, there's one other Horacio Marteleira in the whole world...living across some cabbage fields and up the hill.

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  2. LOL big time!
    Bytheway, My last name is de Pian. I'm of Italian descent and my parents went "digging" to the old town in Northern Italy called Pian and found this.
    http://www.depian.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/depian-arma.jpg
    We thought we were the only ones till facebook came around and there lots of de Pian's in Argentina and S. America. Seems they might of been fascists and fled after the war. Frightening thought.
    As for mutations, I think we're fish. Good swimmers and drink like 'em too!

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    1. A family with Coat of Arms and everything that presumably went with it. I guess it's too late now to return to Pian and declare yourself Lord de Pian?

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