The Boatist

Sailboat Ownership, Translation Work and Tales of Minor Adventure

Retire early, be passionate, don't worry, die poor

Wednesday, September 26, 2012

Temporary Mooring in Alvor

I took a break from doing a translation, stepped into the cockpit and shot this crappy video. The film is shaky because the boat wouldn't lie still. Got to blame something, right?

360º view of Peniche Marina and Port

Even though I've only done one minor translation since last Friday, I haven't accomplishing much of anything since then, except receive some tourists for two units, got into an e-mail marathon with a third tourist that's coming next week and...do you really want to hear more?

Changing the subject to something worthwhile.

Since I plan to drop a mooring in Alvor next spring to keep the boat there during the summer, I've been spending a lot of time planning the perfect mobile mooring I can carry on the boat 175 miles.

Here is the best plan so far: build a 60x60 cm steel grid with 20 cm spikes. Attach an 8-metre 20 mm stud link chain (left over from my last mooring enterprise) to the middle and then attach concrete blocks on top of that.

I'll make the concrete blocks in plastic containers with wire mesh and a protruding nylon rope loop. I'll make lots of them and store them below in all sorts of compartments. This is one of the advantages of owning a small ship.

Once in place, I'll attach a sacrificial line to the grid and lower it to water level, with the heavy chain attached. Then I'll ferry blocks in the dinghy over and chain them on top of the grid and to the heavy chain itself. Next, I'll lower the whole mess to the bottom with the windlass. After everything is ready, I'll dive down cut the sacrificial rope and hope for the best.

With a bit of luck I won't end up like these two boats in Alvor after a winter blow not that long ago.
Mooring in Alvor

6 comments:

  1. Ouh... nasty sight of boats on the rocks (I prefer Scotch). My mooring consists of 2 drum barrels fill with cement with theta (Θ) ship chains connecting to another smaller chain to ropes to boat. I don't trust the smaller chain and wanna replace it but my ear is still a bit off. When it blows I also lower my anchor for a backup but when the wind dies, the boat does a couple of 360's and tangles it all up. Winter blows can be out of control so I plan on hauling out for 4 winter months in order to "sleep"!!

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  2. I had my boat on a mooring for 1 year and never lost a minute of sleep. I placed 3 1-ton concrete blocks in a triangle. The blocks had 50 mm chain embedded and attached with huge shackles to 20 mm stud link chain that were all joined at a huge (I mean massive, stupidly gigantic, swivel). A 14 mm chain ran from this swivel (OK, you're yawning, I can tell) to a large fiberglassed foam buoy. I attached the boat to this holy mess with a 10 mm chain (plus a very thick rope for good measure). Seagulls started shitting copiously on my boat so I sold the mooring for a 1,000 euros and moved back to the marina. The joke was "If my mooring drags, it will take the port with it!!" Today there's a 2-ton boat chained to 3 tons of concrete and 500 kg of chain. A new meaning for overkill.

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  3. Jiangsu yaxing chain co., LTD. (AsAc) is a professional engaged in Marine cable and Marine mooring chain production enterprise, and it is China's Marine cable and Marine mooring chain production and export base, is the world's one of the largest in the industry, the most has the comprehensive strength of the modern enterprise.

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    Replies
    1. Wow, a Chinese woman named Susan offering mooring chain. I love it. Thank you Susan but, as I said, I got some old chain sitting in my garage.

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  4. Jiangsu yaxing anchor chain co., LTD. (AsAc) is a professional engaged in Marine cable and Marine chafe chain production enterprise, and it is China's Marine cable and Marine offshore anchor chain standards production and export base, is the world's one of the largest in the industry, the most has the comprehensive strength of the modern enterprise.

    ReplyDelete